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, water, blankets and shelter from the bitter cold. >>> the u.s. government is taking no chances with citizens and troops in japan. it is now telling all americans to stay at least 50 miles away from the crippled nuclear reactor in fukushima. our foreign affairs correspondent jill dougherty is live at the white house with more on what they're recommending to americans that are in japan right now. hey, jill. >> hey, kiran. there's been a lot of change so let's go through it. late last night the state department announcing that they're having what's called a voluntary departure for the families of people who work in three different locations, embassies and consulate and another location in japan, so that is the u.s. embassy in tokyo, the consulate in nagoya and also the fsi, foreign service institute field school in yokohama. those people are being authorized to leave. they're not being forced or ordered to leave. it's voluntary still. state department says that it will have clarter planes available for those people to leave, 3600 if necessary. alsoer this saying those charter plan
on rebels this hour. new targets, more carnage and the intense pressure for u.s. military action. >>> also, the crisis that libya keeps pushing up gas prices across the country. that's creating more economic misery here at home, and new political danger for president obama. plus, protesters warn the u.s. congress may, may be on the brink of stoking new violence against muslims. anger and anticipation are building before controversial hearings this week on islamic extremism in america. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." libya centering the fourth week of what's now a full-fledged civil war. moammar gadhafi's forces are claiming new gains in their pounding of rebel-held cities. gadhafi maintaining a tight grip on the capital of tripoli, and the opposition appears to be holding out to benghazi in the east, but there are conflicting reports about who is in control of several other key cities, where fierce, fierce battles have been raging now for days. diplomatic sources at the united nations say the united states is working with france and britain on draft resolution on libya, a
. >>> and more now on japan's nuclear crisis and concern about the risks from radiation. the u.s. embassy is urging people within 50 miles of the nuclear plant to evacuate. that's 1.9 million people. japanese officials have told those living within 12 to 19 miles to stay indoors. earlier, the government evacuated about 200,000 people living within a 12-mile radius. and of course the biggest risk is to workers inside the plant trying to avoid a meltdown. more from dr. begsanjay gupta. >>> an important piece of the puzzle, what are radiation levels inside the plant? we know the levels are higher inside where workers are trying to do their work. they try and protect themselves with this, a hazmat suit. they may use a mask that has a little respirator on it. these sort of things provide some help against some forms of radiation but not against the most dangerous forms of radiation like gamma radiation. there's also little sensors that they may use to find out how much radiation they're being exposed to or what the contamination is. these aren't protecting people as much as giving them in the
all of this is. on the heels of a nuclear prices in japan, south carolina here in the u.s. went to court demanding that the nuclear regulatory commission provide a permanent place to store america's waste. there are 104 operating reactors, they're scattered across 65 plants in 31 different states. if you take a look at this map, this gives you a better idea of exactly where this 63 thousand tons of spent fuel, the darker the color of the state, the more radioactive waste that state has, according to the nrc. again, we're talking about 63,000 tons of spent fuel. if you take a look, with the telestrator working, illinois is the state with most, 776 tons. coming in second place is pennsylvania. as we know, pennsylvania, the site of three mile island, the nuclear site that had zadisaste back in the late '80s. and 3,700 tons of spent fuel. pretty much a tie with north carolina and south carolina here. let me show you a map quickly that illustrates what we're talking about when we say spent fuel. these are the spent fuel pools. they're steel-lined concrete pools filled with water like
carrying out any sort of no-fly zone resolution like the one that was passed yesterday. in terms of u.s. involvement, when you think of a no-fly zone, the first thing that comes to mind is american fighter pilots flying over foreign country. but the u.s. has many more ways that it could contribute to this effort. from folks i've been speaking to here in the building, there's also could be the possibility of unmanned drones being used in the area. the u.s. has signal jamming aircraft that could disrupt the communication between colonel gadhafi and some of his forces. they also have radar aircraft that could help coordinate some of the air traffic control if you had planes going out on no fly missions. even planes from other countries. right now, the u.s. has about five warships in that area, although the aircraft carrier, the "uss enterprise" that was in the mediterranean sea has now left. left earlier this week and now out in the arabian sea. there has been, within the u.s., a real debate about this no-fly zone primarily on two fronts. one says the u.s. waited much too long. in fact, th
hear last week, general carter hamm leading the u.s. effort there to enforce the no-fly zone, describing misrata specifically and saying it was very difficult to know exactly where the opposition was, exactly where the government was, exactly where the civilians were and exactly where these heavy weapons were because they are hideing in houses. as we drove out of misrata yesterday we saw soldiers with their vehicles hiding inside buildings, inside buildings. they had driven in through the store fronts and hiding inside the stores and the tanks hiding under trees, so this makes it very, very hard for aircraft to see these heavy weapons and to target them easily without the fear of injuring civilians and that is the challenge that these aircraft flying overhead are facing right now, carol. >> nic robertson reporting live in tripoli, thanks. >>> president obama goes on television to face a war weary nation that would be our own, he says ignoring moammar gadhafi threats of slaughtering civilians would have betrayed our values as americans, but he said using the military to force
. >>> well, 40 minutes past the hour now on this "american morning." check this out, u.s. military creating hummingbird-shaped drones. could they actually change the way the u.s. fights wars? >> well, it say prototype, not ready to go just yet, but certainly, fascinating. chris lawrence is in l.a. with more. i just love that preview of seeing that hummingbird fly all around you. how are they makes this work? >> kiran, t.j., this thing is pretty amazing. it moves like an actual living thing and it weighs less, less than a aa battery. imagine this thing perched on a telephone wire, and you can really start to imagine how difficult it would be to even know it was watching you. imagine a drone as small as a hummingbird, same shape, same sound. wait -- don't imagine. it's here. in this california lab. >> it looks more or less like an indigenous small bird and can fly through small clearings and trees. >> reporter: he says this is how the bird sees us from above. right now, the hummingbird can only fly a little longer than ten minutes. but at that size, imagine what it could do in ten hours. the
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7